Prime's Crib

jpnvines:

お母さんが#電話 をしてる時 ⚠️お母さんが電話してる時は静かに待とうね。〜 サム(´Д` )

When my mother is on the #phone  Wait quietly when your mother is on the phone. 〜 サム(´Д` )

Yes. Okay. Ah, please wait for a moment… I’M ON THE PHONE SHUT UP

Ah, yes, excuse me. 

prehistoric-birds:

Tyrannosaurus and Microraptor by Angela R. Connor | Redbubble

(warning for moving images in the third link)

jacket-buttons:

I used to laugh so much about this.  Not once in all the movies does a woman die on screen.  

I hope that Jurassic World doesn’t break the canon.

carnapptural:

dickensian-werewolf:

zuky:

thesmithian:


…[some] may not remember what made Iran-Contra such an extraordinary scandal. The Reagan administration “raised money privately” by selling weapons to a sworn enemy of the United States. Why? Because it wanted to fund an illegal war in Nicaragua. And when I say “illegal war,” I mean that quite literally—Congress told the Reagan administration, in no uncertain terms, that Reagan could not send money to the Contras. Period. The Reagan administration, unrestrained by laws and the Constitution, did so anyway, and much of the president’s national security team ended up under indictment.

more.

Reagan knew everything. However, I bet this Time magazine piece doesn’t get into the juiciest part of Iran-Contra, which is that in the 1980s the CIA put into operation a crack cocaine pipeline to import narcotics from Central and South America and distribute it in US inner cities. This is not a “conspiracy theory”, this is a documented conspiracy, most rigorously researched and reported by Pulitzer-prize winning journalist Gary Webb, whose series in the San Jose Mercury News and subsequent book “Dark Alliance” literally got him killed. To me, that’s the story of Iran-Contra: not that Reagan sold weapons to Iran, but that the US government imported and sold crack to Black America, as part of an arms and drugs trade which funded war in the Third World and which devastated lives and filled prisons in the USA.

Yep.
And Reagan is an extremely beloved president, he is the one Republicans on campaign invoke to score brownie points.
What an evil fuck. What an evil country.

The Devil

carnapptural:

dickensian-werewolf:

zuky:

thesmithian:

…[some] may not remember what made Iran-Contra such an extraordinary scandal. The Reagan administration “raised money privately” by selling weapons to a sworn enemy of the United States. Why? Because it wanted to fund an illegal war in Nicaragua. And when I say “illegal war,” I mean that quite literally—Congress told the Reagan administration, in no uncertain terms, that Reagan could not send money to the Contras. Period. The Reagan administration, unrestrained by laws and the Constitution, did so anyway, and much of the president’s national security team ended up under indictment.

more.

Reagan knew everything. However, I bet this Time magazine piece doesn’t get into the juiciest part of Iran-Contra, which is that in the 1980s the CIA put into operation a crack cocaine pipeline to import narcotics from Central and South America and distribute it in US inner cities. This is not a “conspiracy theory”, this is a documented conspiracy, most rigorously researched and reported by Pulitzer-prize winning journalist Gary Webb, whose series in the San Jose Mercury News and subsequent book “Dark Alliance” literally got him killed. To me, that’s the story of Iran-Contra: not that Reagan sold weapons to Iran, but that the US government imported and sold crack to Black America, as part of an arms and drugs trade which funded war in the Third World and which devastated lives and filled prisons in the USA.

Yep.

And Reagan is an extremely beloved president, he is the one Republicans on campaign invoke to score brownie points.

What an evil fuck. What an evil country.

The Devil

ewilloughby:

This is a speculative reconstruction of a subadult Deinonychus displaying semi-arboreal characteristics. It’s based on the tenuous assumption that the type specimen (YPM 5205) represents an immature animal, as compared to later specimens with slightly different morphological characteristics, most notably the Harvard specimen (MCZ 4371) described in 1976. Ostrom noted in the description for this newer specimen that one of the major differences between this and the type is the angle of curvature for the second pedal claw: the newer specimen had a much straighter sickle claw, while the original was very strongly curved. However, he had no opinion at the time on whether this difference in morphology represented individual, ontogenetic, or sexual variation.(1)
In 2006, Parsons & Parsons demonstrated unequivocally that the Harvard specimen is a sexually mature adult, and identified some unique adult characters associated with this and other mature adult Deinonychus specimens.(2) Further study by the same authors in 2009 tentatively indicates that the type specimen—a possible subadult—may be associated with arboreal characteristics. Adult specimens are also found to have proportionally shorter arms, leaving room to speculate whether the longer arms of subadults could have been a semi-volant adaptation involved in some incipient gliding (or, perhaps more accurate for an animal that size, “descent-slowing”) capabilities. The more strongly recurved second pedal claw is implicated in climbing, and its lateral compression and inner arc are compared in this paper to the same ungual in Melanerpes, the red-headed woodpecker (a highly scansorial modern bird).(3)
Behavior rarely fossilizes, and the idea that immature Deinonychus occupied a partially arboreal niche is still highly speculative, especially given that few modern archosaurs possess markedly different ecologies at different ontogenic stages. And while I don’t usually support copying extant birds this precisely for serious paleoart, it proved to be an excellent practice piece to flesh out a highly speculative idea.
This piece is based directly on an excellent photograph by my most admired living scientist, experimental psychologist Steven Pinker, who was kind enough to grant me permission to do so. Pinker is a world-renowned cognitive scientist as well as a talented photographer, and you can check out more of his better angles of our nature on his website at stevepinker.com.
It’s interesting to note that of all known specimens of deinonychosaurs, a sizable percentage of them represent juveniles or subadults, animals that lived very brief lives before succumbing to nature’s indifference. For the life of a Deinonychus was surely solitary, poor, nasty, brutish and short.
—
1. Ostrom, J. H. (1976). “On a new specimen of the Lower Cretaceous theropod dinosaur Deinonychus antirrhopus”. Breviora 439: 1–21.2. Parsons, W. L.; Parsons, K. M. (2006). “Morphology and size of an adult specimen of Deinonychus antirrhopus, (Saurischia, Theropoda)”. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology 26 (3 sup.): 109A.3. Parsons, W. L.; Parsons, K. M. (2009). “Further descriptions of the osteology of Deinonychus antirrhopus (Saurischia, Theropoda)”. Bulletin of the Buffalo Society of Natural Sciences 38: 43–54.

ewilloughby:

This is a speculative reconstruction of a subadult Deinonychus displaying semi-arboreal characteristics. It’s based on the tenuous assumption that the type specimen (YPM 5205) represents an immature animal, as compared to later specimens with slightly different morphological characteristics, most notably the Harvard specimen (MCZ 4371) described in 1976. Ostrom noted in the description for this newer specimen that one of the major differences between this and the type is the angle of curvature for the second pedal claw: the newer specimen had a much straighter sickle claw, while the original was very strongly curved. However, he had no opinion at the time on whether this difference in morphology represented individual, ontogenetic, or sexual variation.(1)

In 2006, Parsons & Parsons demonstrated unequivocally that the Harvard specimen is a sexually mature adult, and identified some unique adult characters associated with this and other mature adult Deinonychus specimens.(2) Further study by the same authors in 2009 tentatively indicates that the type specimen—a possible subadult—may be associated with arboreal characteristics. Adult specimens are also found to have proportionally shorter arms, leaving room to speculate whether the longer arms of subadults could have been a semi-volant adaptation involved in some incipient gliding (or, perhaps more accurate for an animal that size, “descent-slowing”) capabilities. The more strongly recurved second pedal claw is implicated in climbing, and its lateral compression and inner arc are compared in this paper to the same ungual in Melanerpes, the red-headed woodpecker (a highly scansorial modern bird).(3)

Behavior rarely fossilizes, and the idea that immature Deinonychus occupied a partially arboreal niche is still highly speculative, especially given that few modern archosaurs possess markedly different ecologies at different ontogenic stages. And while I don’t usually support copying extant birds this precisely for serious paleoart, it proved to be an excellent practice piece to flesh out a highly speculative idea.

This piece is based directly on an excellent photograph by my most admired living scientist, experimental psychologist Steven Pinker, who was kind enough to grant me permission to do so. Pinker is a world-renowned cognitive scientist as well as a talented photographer, and you can check out more of his better angles of our nature on his website at stevepinker.com.

It’s interesting to note that of all known specimens of deinonychosaurs, a sizable percentage of them represent juveniles or subadults, animals that lived very brief lives before succumbing to nature’s indifference. For the life of a Deinonychus was surely solitary, poor, nasty, brutish and short.

1. Ostrom, J. H. (1976). “On a new specimen of the Lower Cretaceous theropod dinosaur Deinonychus antirrhopus”. Breviora 439: 1–21.

2. Parsons, W. L.; Parsons, K. M. (2006). “Morphology and size of an adult specimen of Deinonychus antirrhopus, (Saurischia, Theropoda)”. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology 26 (3 sup.): 109A.

3. Parsons, W. L.; Parsons, K. M. (2009). “Further descriptions of the osteology of Deinonychus antirrhopus (Saurischia, Theropoda)”. Bulletin of the Buffalo Society of Natural Sciences 38: 43–54.

a-dinosaur-a-day:

image

Source: http://www.nhm.ac.uk/resources/nature-online/life/dinosaurs/dinosaur-directory/images/%5Creconstruction/small/sinocalliopteryx.jpg

Name: Sinocalliopteryx gigas

Name Meaning: Giant Chinese Beautiful Feather

First Described: 2007

Described By: Ji et al

kanayahummel:

theperksofbeingdornish:

ohanameansfamily24:

-behindbars:

the-grand-highboob:

thusmylife:

b1ush:

condescendingchristian:



oh my god

As a person from California, this is 100% accurate

As a person from Michigan, this is 100% accurate

As a person from England I was so confused because I forgot you use the Fahrenheit system 

50 degrees in England 
100 degrees in England

 

I don’t know why I found the skeletons so funny, it’s almost like they’re dancing really sarcastically?

they’re british skeletons of course they’re dancing sarcastically. 

kanayahummel:

theperksofbeingdornish:

ohanameansfamily24:

-behindbars:

the-grand-highboob:

thusmylife:

b1ush:

condescendingchristian:

image

oh my god

As a person from California, this is 100% accurate

As a person from Michigan, this is 100% accurate

As a person from England I was so confused because I forgot you use the Fahrenheit system 

50 degrees in England 

100 degrees in England


 

I don’t know why I found the skeletons so funny, it’s almost like they’re dancing really sarcastically?

they’re british skeletons of course they’re dancing sarcastically. 

ghdos:

athousandhiddensecrets:

mixyblue:

this comic affects me in so many ways

[x]

He killed himself again in the end just to save Ron because he wanted to die, and Ron didn’t. Powerful.

Interesting story arc here.

euphorbic:

ang3lsh1:

lilmissaudwee92:

shoorm:

The East Asian women + colored hair trope
(An extension of extraextraex’s post.)
Looking at the pictures above, it’s pretty easy to find the similarities. East Asian women with dyed purple/blue/red hair, usually in a streak. No matter how you look at this, this is an uncomfortably specific trend in media. Yeah, it looks cute, but after seeing this over and over again, it becomes a boring, racist trope. This originated from a variety of possibilities: the creators trying to “Americanize” the East Asian character, make them more “exotic”, or to show how unique this character is. She’s not a giggling schoolgirl or a delicate lotus flower, she’s different! See, she has a streak of purple hair (god forbid she dyes it any other color), look how radical that is, look at our modern Dragon Lady!
And yes, Knives dyed her hair to look like Ramona, and yes, Somni-451’s hair is like that to mark her as a clone, but these characters do not exist in a vacuum. You can justify why a character has a specific appearance, but in the end, this character was created, and contributes to stereotypes no matter the intent.
So the moral of this story is that your Asian character with a strip of purple hair isn’t original. It isn’t unique. No matter how innocent this appears to be, it can be detrimental to East Asian girls, since the characters that look like them have the same exact traits. It’s time to explore different ways of designing East Asian characters, instead of just slapping on some purple and calling it a day.

wow i did not notice this until it got pointed out.

As a typical South East Asian, currently living in South East Asia, you can go on and on about this being a stereotypical Asian trait or whatever, but you know what? I would dye my hair this way if I weren’t a working professional because, you know what? I actually like that style. I like having random highlights because it looks cool. And I have seen most of the teenagers with outrageous colours: blue, red, purples, even rainbow colours because it’s a way to stand out among the sea of black hair. So stop trying to find every single little detail to nitpick and show that wow, you get it and you’re standing up for SJ over something that’s actually a common appearance in, Surprise! South East Asia.

You know, let’s be real here; this is bullshit. Once upon a time SJ was actually a really awesome thing and when done properly it can still be a powerful tool. The problem is all the wannabe allies trying to show how conscientious they are of SJ problems when all they really want is a pat on the back.
However, you don’t get a pat on the back for undermining what was once an excellent method of change. You aren’t an ally when you make these sort of claims, because what you have done and continue to do is destroy the credibility of SJ. I see far more bitching about SJ on my dash than I should and this post (and it’s cited predecessor) is a particularly good example of the sort of bullshit claims that drive rejection of SJ. (Though, admittedly, this one is laughably transparent.)
As an aside; here in Japan and over in Korea it isn’t uncommon to see girls with colorful highlights or lowlights. It isn’t uncommon to see girls with colorful highlights in movies, television, anime, games, or PMVs here, either. And since western cartoons were referenced, maybe watch some anime.
So if you’re bothered by that trope and you want to put a stop to it, perhaps your first stop should be Asia.
If you really want to use SJ for Asian women, there are very real issues that Japanese-American women have to deal with on a daily basis. For example, OP includes an Asian prostitute from Skyfall. Why are we worried about hair when the Asian Prostitute stereotype is sitting right there? How could you go off about hair when something far less shallow and far more insidious is going on? 
Nikki Wong is included even though she is a character that questions authority which breaks the Submissive Asian stereotype.
Yukio from The Wolverine is a hot mess of stereotypes in her source material (in the comics she was a ninja), but no, we’ll talk about her hair.
Akima Kunimoto was actually one of the main characters and a pilot that didn’t take shit. She breaks stereotypes.
Knives Chau is included because half her hair is blue, but all of the white female lead’s hair is purple. It’s appropriate. However, Knives is problematic as a Submissive Asian for Scott Pilgrim. She exists as a male fantasy; an Asian woman that is obsessed with him.
I’m going to end this with Mako Mori. She’s a Japanese woman that is respectful rather than submissive, isn’t a love interest, and is informed by her Asian-ness rather than defined by it. Hell, she even has her own narrative arc.
TL;DR
If colorful highlights in Asian characters’ hair is a trope it is one fully embraced by many Asian countries. 
Social Justice is undermined by claims like that in point 1.
The original posts lost an opportunity to address damaging stereotypes Asian women really do face.

euphorbic:

ang3lsh1:

lilmissaudwee92:

shoorm:

The East Asian women + colored hair trope

(An extension of extraextraex’s post.)

Looking at the pictures above, it’s pretty easy to find the similarities. East Asian women with dyed purple/blue/red hair, usually in a streak. No matter how you look at this, this is an uncomfortably specific trend in media. Yeah, it looks cute, but after seeing this over and over again, it becomes a boring, racist trope. This originated from a variety of possibilities: the creators trying to “Americanize” the East Asian character, make them more “exotic”, or to show how unique this character is. She’s not a giggling schoolgirl or a delicate lotus flower, she’s different! See, she has a streak of purple hair (god forbid she dyes it any other color), look how radical that is, look at our modern Dragon Lady!

And yes, Knives dyed her hair to look like Ramona, and yes, Somni-451’s hair is like that to mark her as a clone, but these characters do not exist in a vacuum. You can justify why a character has a specific appearance, but in the end, this character was created, and contributes to stereotypes no matter the intent.

So the moral of this story is that your Asian character with a strip of purple hair isn’t original. It isn’t unique. No matter how innocent this appears to be, it can be detrimental to East Asian girls, since the characters that look like them have the same exact traits. It’s time to explore different ways of designing East Asian characters, instead of just slapping on some purple and calling it a day.

wow i did not notice this until it got pointed out.

As a typical South East Asian, currently living in South East Asia, you can go on and on about this being a stereotypical Asian trait or whatever, but you know what? I would dye my hair this way if I weren’t a working professional because, you know what? I actually like that style. I like having random highlights because it looks cool. And I have seen most of the teenagers with outrageous colours: blue, red, purples, even rainbow colours because it’s a way to stand out among the sea of black hair. So stop trying to find every single little detail to nitpick and show that wow, you get it and you’re standing up for SJ over something that’s actually a common appearance in, Surprise! South East Asia.

You know, let’s be real here; this is bullshit. Once upon a time SJ was actually a really awesome thing and when done properly it can still be a powerful tool. The problem is all the wannabe allies trying to show how conscientious they are of SJ problems when all they really want is a pat on the back.

However, you don’t get a pat on the back for undermining what was once an excellent method of change. You aren’t an ally when you make these sort of claims, because what you have done and continue to do is destroy the credibility of SJ. I see far more bitching about SJ on my dash than I should and this post (and it’s cited predecessor) is a particularly good example of the sort of bullshit claims that drive rejection of SJ. (Though, admittedly, this one is laughably transparent.)

As an aside; here in Japan and over in Korea it isn’t uncommon to see girls with colorful highlights or lowlights. It isn’t uncommon to see girls with colorful highlights in movies, television, anime, games, or PMVs here, either. And since western cartoons were referenced, maybe watch some anime.

So if you’re bothered by that trope and you want to put a stop to it, perhaps your first stop should be Asia.

If you really want to use SJ for Asian women, there are very real issues that Japanese-American women have to deal with on a daily basis. For example, OP includes an Asian prostitute from Skyfall. Why are we worried about hair when the Asian Prostitute stereotype is sitting right there? How could you go off about hair when something far less shallow and far more insidious is going on? 

Nikki Wong is included even though she is a character that questions authority which breaks the Submissive Asian stereotype.

Yukio from The Wolverine is a hot mess of stereotypes in her source material (in the comics she was a ninja), but no, we’ll talk about her hair.

Akima Kunimoto was actually one of the main characters and a pilot that didn’t take shit. She breaks stereotypes.

Knives Chau is included because half her hair is blue, but all of the white female lead’s hair is purple. It’s appropriate. However, Knives is problematic as a Submissive Asian for Scott Pilgrim. She exists as a male fantasy; an Asian woman that is obsessed with him.

I’m going to end this with Mako Mori. She’s a Japanese woman that is respectful rather than submissive, isn’t a love interest, and is informed by her Asian-ness rather than defined by it. Hell, she even has her own narrative arc.

TL;DR

  1. If colorful highlights in Asian characters’ hair is a trope it is one fully embraced by many Asian countries. 
  2. Social Justice is undermined by claims like that in point 1.
  3. The original posts lost an opportunity to address damaging stereotypes Asian women really do face.
webbgirl34:

thebigsisteryouneveraskedfor:

Gisella Perl was forced to work as a doctor in Auschwitz concentration camp during the holocaust.
She was ordered to report ever pregnant women do the physician Dr. Josef Mengele, who would then use the women for cruel experiments (e.g. vivisections) before killing them.
She saved hundreds of women by performing abortions on them before their pregnancy was discovered, without having access to basic medical supplies. She became known as the “Angel of Auschwitz”.
After being rescued from Bergen-Belsen concentration camp she tried to commit suicide, but survived, recovered and kept working as a gynecologist, delivering more than 3000 babies.

I want to nail this to the forehead of every anti-abortionist who uses the word “Holocaust” when talking about legal abortions.

webbgirl34:

thebigsisteryouneveraskedfor:

Gisella Perl was forced to work as a doctor in Auschwitz concentration camp during the holocaust.

She was ordered to report ever pregnant women do the physician Dr. Josef Mengele, who would then use the women for cruel experiments (e.g. vivisections) before killing them.

She saved hundreds of women by performing abortions on them before their pregnancy was discovered, without having access to basic medical supplies. She became known as the “Angel of Auschwitz”.

After being rescued from Bergen-Belsen concentration camp she tried to commit suicide, but survived, recovered and kept working as a gynecologist, delivering more than 3000 babies.

I want to nail this to the forehead of every anti-abortionist who uses the word “Holocaust” when talking about legal abortions.